Oh Gnome You Didn’t!

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On this episode of Expanded Perspectives the guys start the show talking about they’re favorite Holiday drinks and then in Italy, the legend of La Befana is one that is popularly told around the time of the Epiphany. What does a Catholic holiday have to do with modern Paganism? Well, La Befana happens to be a witch. According to folklore, on the night before the feast of the Epiphany in early January, Befana flies around on her broom, delivering gifts. Much like Santa Claus, she leaves candy, fruit, or small gifts in the stockings of children who are well-behaved throughout the year. On the other hand, if a child is naughty, he or she can expect to find a lump of coal left behind by La Befana.

Then, Researchers at Oregon State have patented a new strain of seaweed that tastes like bacon when it’s cooked. The seaweed, a form of red marine algae, looks like translucent red lettuce. It also has twice the nutritional value of kale and grows very quickly. Did we mention it tastes like bacon? According to Oregon State researcher Chris Langdon, his team started growing the new strain while trying to find a good food source for edible sea snails, or abalone, a very popular food in many parts of Asia. The strain is a new type of red algae that normally grows along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. Then, Kyle brings up two strange Humanoid sightings where in both cases they were wearing some sort of shinny one piece suits.

Then, Cam brings up an interesting account of a hunter spotting something in the woods otherworldly. The witness and his cousin were out hunting near Johnson City, TN and were sitting on the side of the wall of a rather large hollow which consisted of very thick underbrush and lots of evergreen. A larger valley then lead first to a clearing and then on to a supposed old Indian graveyard. All of the sudden they heard the brush in the hollow below rattling and they could tell that whatever was making the sounds was rather large. What appeared before them was a three horned man beast.

After the break Cam brings up some fascinating Gnome sightings from different parts of the world. The Gnome is one of a species of diminutive beings, usually described as shriveled little old men, that inhabit the interior of the earth and act as guardians of its treasures. Gnomes are very widespread species, known to a number of human races. Germans name them Erdmanleins, except in the Alpine areas, where they are called Heinzemannchens. In Denmark and Norway they are Nisse; Nissen is a Swedish variation. In Brittany they are called Nains. Tontti to the Finns and Foddenskkmaend is their name in Iceland. The Polish call they by the familar Gnom. Bulgaria and Albania, however, use Dudje. In Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, Gnomes are called Mano. The Dutch use Kabouter and the Belgian, Skritek. Switzerland and Luxembourg use the same name, Kleinmanneken, which means “littlemen.” Domovoi Djedoes is used in western Russia.

Gnomes consist of a number of different types. The most common is the Forest Gnome who rarely comes into contact with man. The Garden Gnome lives in old gardens and enjoys telling melancoly tales. Dune Gnomes are slightly larger than their woodland breathren and choose remarkably drab clothing. House Gnomes have the most knowledge of man, often speaking his language. It is from this family that Gnome Kings are chosen. Farm Gnomes resemble their House brethen, but are more conservative in manner and dress. Siberian Gnomes have been more interbred than other Gnomes and associate freely with trolls. They are much larger than the other types and have an infinately more nasty nature. It is best never to evoke the ire of such Gnomes for they delight in revenge.

Thanks for listening to Expanded Perspectives! Show Notes:

Music:

All music for Expanded Perspectives is provided by Pretty Lights. Purchase, Download and Donate at www.prettylightsmusic.com.

Songs Used:

  • Pretty Lights vs. Led Zeppelin
  • At Last I Am Free
  • The Time Has Come
  • Empty  Station